Authors, Books, publishing, Writing

Getting Published: The waiting

It’s been a little since my last post, but I’ve been busy with getting a poetry book published and in the process of getting another children’s book published. Also, getting a wedding planned and organized. Needless to say, I’ve been busy.

After all the proof reviews are done and proofs are finished, the book will be sent to the printer. I’m sure there’s more that goes on behind the scenes, but I’m not in on that part of the process. As a writer, you probably won’t be either. So it basically becomes a waiting game from here.

This wait time can seem like ages, so here’s a few tips to occupy your time while waiting for printed copies to wind up in your hands and available to readers.

1: Start a new writing project. You don’t want to be a one and done writer.

2: Generate buzz on your social media platforms. You do have a couple of those, right.

3: Get some promotional/marketing materials ready. Think book marks, a sign with information to put on your table at book signings/author fairs. You can do pens, pencils, or something else. Think small and fairly cheap so you can hand them out to people wherever you’re at. I got 500 bookmarks for around $60 from https://smartpress.com/. They are professional and high quality. Just be prepared for a bit of a learning curve.

4. Go out and experience life and the world. You need material to draw from and the best way I’ve found to refill the creative well is just getting out and doing stuff.

I hope these blogs have helped clarify some of the publishing process. Until next time, Stay Focused and Write On!

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Authors, Books, Fiction, publishing

Getting Published: Approval Process Part 2

In my last post, I talked about the approval process for illustrations (which may only apply to the cover if you don’t have illustrations in the book). In this post, I’m going to talk about the process for layout and text approval.

This process for me was very similar to the illustrations approval. When the book was formatted and ready to be sent to the printer, the publisher sent proofs of the final version to be sent to the printer. I cannot stress this enough. Go Over The Proof Thoroughly! This is your chance to catch anything before it’s too late or costly to make changes.

With my proofs, the publisher and I changed several things before ultimately approving them. We did some formatting changes on a certain characters text, which wound up deleting or pushing two paragraphs off the page. If we hadn’t been diligent, we would have printed with missing text. And nobody wants an incomplete story.

A lot of this boils down to establishing a good working relationship with your publisher or contact for the publisher. Being courteous in your correspondence and timely with responses goes a long way in establishing this relationship. Remember, you want the publisher to want to work with you again.

Until next time, Stay Focused and Write On!

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Authors, Books, Writing

Getting Published: The Contract

In this post, I’m going to talk about my experience with receiving and signing a contract for a book deal. Again, this is my personal experience with the process, it’s not the definitive example of a contract and the process, just something to file away for when you need it.

I wasn’t expecting a contract when it showed up in an attachment to an email informing me I hadn’t won the competition I had submitted to. But they liked the story enough to want to publish it. A lot ran through my mind. Things like: This is exciting, do I need to have a lawyer, what’s this going to cost me out-of-pocket, and did I mention this is exciting.

Once I looked over the contract, I decided I really didn’t need anyone else to go over it. I’m sure this wouldn’t be the case for every contract, but in this case, everything seemed on the up and up.

Here’s a few of the more useful things I learned about book contracts.

They read like legislation, which is to say, heavy on the lawyer speak. Go read some proposed bills or current law if you don’t know what I’m talking about.

Get a notebook and pen. Read the contract line by line jotting down what’s required of you and what the publisher is offering. This helped me tremendously.

Make sure you know what rights you retain and what rights the publisher gets. There’s potential for legal troubles if you don’t abide by the terms of the contract.

If in doubt, ask. If you’re aligned with a reputable publisher, they’re going to help you.

Take your time to decide if the contract is a good fit for you and your goals.

Again, this is just one experience with a book contract and my publisher made the process a breeze. Just be wary and when in doubt, get someone else to look it over.

Stay Focused and Write On!

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Books, Poems, Poetry, Spoken Word, Writing

Fellow Poet

   Another busy week is in the books.  I celebrated my 34th birthday, in grand fashion, with good food, friends, and some gambling at one of the local casinos.  I managed to get a little work done on a short story, worked on a couple of poems, and did a little editing.
   One of the other highlights of the week was being able to attend a book launch for one of the ladies in the writing group I attend when my schedule allows.  It was great to see the turnout and support for a local author.
   The night was 50’s themed, with some poodle skirts and fedoras.  It always amazes me to see the diverse group of people who attend poetry events in my area.  The event started with members of the writing group reading select poems from the book and then Nancy reading several poems. The night ended with a round of open mic and a bit of socializing afterwards.
  Nancy’s poems exhibit such a wide range of emotions and paint a vivid picture of growing up. I can honestly say that I was glad to be able to support Nancy and participate in her event.
   Go check out some of her work at,

http://nancypulley.weebly.com/

As always, Stay Focused and Write On!
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